Category

Toddlers

How To Wipe…(and 4 More Tips For Potty Training a Daughter)

By | Bedtime, Daddy, Daughter, Development, education, Growing Up, Health, Parenting, Potty Training, Relationships, Rewards, Tips, Toddlers, Toilet Training | No Comments

potty-trainingIf you are pulling your weight as a Dad, you already know that your little princess can push out some pretty serious poo.

It’s called potty training and it isn’t for the faint of heart. Plus, when you’re teaching a young child with different “plumbing” than your own, you may feel a bit lost at times.

That’s why we spoke to Dr. Heather Wittenberg. She knows her (stuff).

Dr. Wittenberg specializes in the development of babies, toddlers, young children… and their parents. She offers no-hype, practical advice that is rooted in science and road-tested in her own home. She speaks on behalf of the Pull-Ups® brand. The doctor dropped some knowledge so you can point your little one in the right direction the next time she wants to drop a deuce.

1. Normal is what normal is…

“A lot of parents get caught up in thinking that potty training is something to accomplish or to check off of a list,” Dr. Wittenberg said. “They start putting expectations on their kids and think at certain ages they should be at X, Y, or Z.”

“Toddlerhood is when individual differences really make their first major appearance and you start to see a ton of divergences in the ‘normal’ range. There is a huge range of ‘normal’ for potty training. But you typically start seeing interest around 18 months and if your toddler isn’t well on her way to being comfortably toilet trained by four, you’d want to call in expert help.”

Whether your girl is eager to learn or afraid to go near the toilet, just don’t push to the point of resistance. It’s a process and a chance to celebrate each tiny step. Don’t wait until they have mastered it to celebrate with them.

2. Avoid this like the plague…

Constipation.

Some kids have a resistance to bowel movements. “There’s a cycle of withholding in some toddlers and that includes withholding their poops,” she said.

“They’ll do this for a lot of odd and uniquely toddler-ish reasons. They may imagine that poop is a part of their own body and if they get it out they are giving up part of themselves. Others might have had a bout of constipation and it hurt so bad that just the thought of going again scares them. They don’t have the logic to think ‘This may hurt but I have to get it out’ and trying to use that rationale will not work with a toddler.”

If you see any signs of constipation, you need to go full bore on any type of dietary stuff is ok with your child and pediatrician (prunes, fiber, water). “The typical American diet is terrible for this,” Dr. Wittenberg said. “Toddlers are getting to the point where they’ll only eat chicken nuggets and buttered pasta. They aren’t eating nutritionally.”

Keeping an eye on this is important. You don’t want to enter the world of suppositories and enemas. “Toddlers understandably are terrified of those things and feel are invasive. So you need to do everything you can to avoid getting to that point.”

3. What to call her genitalia…

It’s about being natural.

“What’s important to your daughter isn’t the specific language that you choose,” Dr. Wittenberg explained. “What’s important is that you feel comfortable using it. Being natural and comfortable with whatever names and conversation you have developed over the course of your relationship will allow her to feel your comfort.”

“You’ve been changing diapers all this time,” Dr. Wittenberg explained. “You’re involved with her physical body and emotional health. The transition from changing diapers to using the potty is just a natural evolution of what you’re already doing. Her language is evolving. She can obviously understand more and put words to body parts. What it comes down to is your family’s culture, personalities, and what kind of Dad you already are. Some are technical and clinical in their body part naming – others are silly with the names.”

Dr. Wittenberg stressed, “Just because Dads are a different gender than their daughter they do not need to somehow feel inadequate or incapable of having a perfectly comfortable, relaxed conversation about all manners of the potty.”

4. Clean up

(This is a tricky one for many dads who don’t have working knowledge of the parts. So pay attention…)

“I see many Moms make the same mistakes when it comes to wiping,” Wittenberg said. “Young girls are more vulnerable to a urinary tract infection because they are taking the toilet paper, reaching under to wipe their vulva and are going too far back. She’s reaching her bum and she’s pulling forward some bacteria.”

“Just have your daughter blot, in place, a couple of times right where the pee comes out when she’s done,” Wittenberg said. “She doesn’t have to get any more aggressive than that. No vigorous wiping is needed. A couple of blots with a few squares of toilet paper is plenty for pee.”

If you’re worried about seeing “white buildup” in her privates, don’t be.

“Some parents worry about vaginal discharge (white buildup) that is normally present and healthy,” she said. “That is the vagina’s ‘self cleaning’ mode and it is something to just ignore. It isn’t something that has to be cleaned out. In fact there’s a bit of a protective function there. Dads don’t have to help her get in there and try to make it visually clean. Regular bath time helps do that.”

On the back end of things, it’s just like the boys. She should wipe back and up from the rear after poops. Your role? Spot checker to make sure it’s all clear. They didn’t tell you you’d be doing that when you became a father did they?

5. Last call!

So she’s doing great during the day but is still wet at night? You might have read some advice to cut off all liquids for a certain period of time before bed. Obviously it stands to reason that you don’t want to drink a full-sized juice a couple of hours before bed but

“It’s actually a physical maturity issue,” Dr. Wittenberg said. “There is a hormone that is secreted in the brain that shuts off urine production. That hormone sometimes doesn’t develop in a child until 2 or 4 or even 7. It doesn’t matter what you do. Without that hormone, their body is not going to turn down urine production at night and you are going to have a wet bed or diaper. Once your child is ready to stay dry at night, the amount of liquid you give them before bed won’t be the main factor. And putting pressure on a child to stay dry at night doesn’t help.”

There you have it. For my daughter and me, there is an evening ritual of her grabbing her Pull-Ups® out of the drawer and holding it behind her back so I can guess which Disney character is on them. My best streak? 4 in a row. No cheating. It’s all part of the process.

Whatever it takes for you to become more comfortable as your girl’s caregiver, do it. Just make sure to enjoy the ride…even if it stinks from time to time.


Dr. Wittenberg is a Pull-Ups® Potty Training Partner She believes there is no “one size fits all” answer to most challenging parenting questions, and she is committed to help find individualized, workable solutions that help make parenting easier – and more fun! She can be found via her website (www.BabyShrink.com) or Twitter (@BabyShrink). She is the author of the “Let’s Get This Potty Started” book.

 

Saying I’m Sorry…

By | Conversations, Daddy, Daughter, Development, Discipline, Fathers and Daughters, Growing Up, Parenting, Quality Time, Relationships, Rules, Toddlers | No Comments

n-SAD-GIRL-628x314I raised my voice to my four-year old daughter.

I even “stopped the car” to turn around and tell her that her behavior wasn’t going to win her any Miss Congeniality sashes any time soon. Ok, I’m paraphrasing, but I was stern with her and the look on her face showed me that the message got through.

I had lost my patience. I immediately regretted it.

While some of you may be thinking “no big deal” or “sometimes you’ve got to be the bad guy,” that’s just not me. You may think it’s a mountain out of a molehill, but strong words have a lasting effect. I still remember things that were said to me decades ago that affected who I was and grew into. One of the goals of purposeful parenting is to grow and learn from the past.

It isn’t easy. In fact, it’s hard as hell. Kids can test your limits.

But I made her a promise when she was about two hours old. I told her I would do everything I could to show her what it was to be a good man. So as impossible as it may become (See: teenager), I’m going to hold myself to my word.

That’s why when we got home we had another of our “hands and eyes” talks. It’s just something we do to make sure we are listening to each other when it’s really important. She held my hands, we made eye contact, and I told her I was sorry for raising my voice at her. I explained that even though her actions were wrong, it was just as wrong for me to get upset.

She consoled me and told me that it “was OK, you’re my Daddy” which made me sad to think of how many parents might actually think that is true. Big people don’t get a pass just because they made the little people. I told her that it wasn’t OK and that I would do my best to never do it again.

I believe you can get the desired result without taking shortcuts. To me, losing your patience and raising your voice to intimidate a smaller human is not only a shortcut, it’s detrimental to your future relationship with her.

I have no idea whether I’m in the minority/majority when it comes to this parenting technique. Some of my closest friends have no qualms over using “Dadtimidation.”  I have no frame of reference as Grace is my first and only child. I suppose it doesn’t work for everyone. It may not even end up working for me.

But if I want to have a meaningful conversation with her when she’s 14, I’ll start when she’s 4 and try to exemplify how we should communicate with each other.

Actions speak louder than words? I’d change that to “actions should replace your louder words.” In other words, back up what you say instead of raising your voice.

Don’t confuse calm with weakness. While I adore my daughter and cherish every second we share, she still has to follow the rules. There are toys to be picked up, messes to be cleaned, and teeth to be brushed. Those things get done. Disobeying has consequences and she understands discipline. I’m lucky. I’ve seen some other children and how they behave. In comparison, I won the kiddo lotto with Grace.

But I’m the grownup. If it gets to the point where I feel the need to raise my voice, I try and reevaluate what I am doing so it doesn’t get to that point. Most adults have the mental capacity to approach a problem from different angles to find a solution. Most kids don’t.

I’m far from an expert. I’m just parenting by my gut and trying every day to do what I feel is right. So you can take this advice or leave it. But be kind to one another…even when she’s naughty. It will take more time and effort on your part, but that’s fatherhood.

Oh, and if you mess up, say you’re sorry.

T.

It’s OK to Say Goodbye to Saturday Morning Cartoons

By | Custody, Daddy, Daughter, Fathers and Daughters, Growing Up, Memories, Parenting, Quality Time, Technology, Toddlers | No Comments

bugs bunnyLike other kids of my generation, Saturday morning was Shangri-La. We had a respite from the crazed world of learning math or doing chores. We had our Saturday Morning Cartoons. It was incredible.

Bugs and his Looney Tunes pals rocked.

Rocky and Bullwinkle rocked.

Schoolhouse Rock …well, you know.

(The Tick ‘Spoooooooned’)

With the roof of my mouth barely healed from last week’s shredding from sugary cereal, I would bravely refill my bowl and the Cap’n and I would head off for some quality time.

But earlier this week I learned that the cable channel CW was the last ship to set sail on the showing of the animated awesomeness that was our kids’ God-given right to punch out from reality.

And that’s ok.

You may think it strange for me to say I’m glad my daughter lives in an “on demand” world but in some ways I completely am. I’m rooting for it.

When I have her, my “Saturday mornings” (and hopefully this is how she’ll recall them, too) consist of going all out for breakfast with Daddy’s cinnamon pancakes, eggs, and fresh fruit. We find crafts to do or practice reading and writing. If it’s summer, maybe we get some pool time in. How much can we do together? What cool memories are going to be made today? How much more can I love you?

Why would I want her to check out? Screen time is a last resort in our house.

But that doesn’t mean I don’t want her to know who Mickey Mouse is. For the record, there’s a Mickey Mouse short about Minnie putting on too much perfume that is reigning supreme in the iPad’s replay numbers.

I just don’t mind the fact that we can decide when and for how long that time is.

I do the same thing with my “House of Cards” or “Walking Dead” fixes. I watch them at a time we don’t spend together or she’s in bed. Thank you, Netflix and DVR. I can be a present parent and still get to watch my favorite shows. Win/win.

So why shouldn’t she get the same entitlement to convenience? I don’t think being able to watch her shows at a whim will turn her into an entitled citizen, expecting the same treatment from everything in her life. We figured it out pretty quickly, she will too.

Plus it frees up time for her to “be” in the room. You remember that blank stare we all had as kids. Our folks had to say our name 4 times before we snapped away from the boob tube.

So, goodbye Saturday Morning Cartoons. It was fun. It really was.

You’ve gone the way of the VCR and Atari.

Parting is somewhat-sweet sorrow…maybe more than I care to admit.

That’s your cue, Porky.


If you like this, maybe you’ll like some of my other favorites? My Guppy,  My New Morning Show,  Men Suck… , The Wonder of a Weed, and the G-Talk series


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Unscripted: Improv Fatherhood

By | Conversations, Daddy, Daughter, Development, Fathers and Daughters, Memories, Parenting, Quality Time, Relationships, Toddlers | No Comments

improvWant to be a better Dad? Try improvisational comedy.

No, you don’t have to get on stage. But the basics of what an improv class can teach you will help any father’s ability to communicate with his kids.

Improv (at least a version of it) is one of those things that comes second nature to me. Years of morning radio honed the skill of immersing myself in random “created realities” and to this day I’m more than ready, probably to a fault, to jump into those spaces and play around. Quick-witted conversations are my comfy place.

So when I talk to my four-year old daughter, it’s like my own personal Disneyland. She doesn’t feel the need to be bound by logic or order when it comes to her conversations. I love that.

So first things first, know your audience. And be ready to flip the script on your “material” at a moment’s notice.

Here are three other rules of improv comedy that you should follow:

LISTEN

I know it sounds easy but if you don’t hear what she is saying you can’t be part of the conversation. And please, when your girl says something that doesn’t make sense, run with it. Don’t correct her. If she’s really trying to communicate something but struggling with what words to use, this will help her get from here to there without her getting frustrated by you . Just play around with what she is actually saying. If she’s just being silly, all the better.

DON’T DENY

Here’s an example of denial.

“Hi, my name is Jim. Welcome to my zoo.”
“This isn’t a zoo, it’s an airplane. And you’re not Jim, you’re a go-go dancer.”
See? Not fun.

Grace has told me about wolves that serve ice cream to which I replied “What flavor?” She also said that she uploads her thoughts to the rainbow clouds hanging above her bed to which I ask “Is the pink one full yet?” You get it. Don’t deny the reality being created. You’ll be amazed at what you can learn about what she’s really thinking when you let her create the world in which to speak.

NO FUNNY BUSINESS

The hidden riddle of improv is that the harder you try to be funny the unfunnier it gets. The same goes with your girls. Try and be funny and you’ll just fall flat. Your goal? Keep things interesting.  Keep adding to the “scene” you and your daughter are creating.  When that happens, the funny usually comes out all by itself. The best ways to go are to stick to your character, stick to the story that is being told, and to stay within the reality she has made.

Improvisation isn’t for everyone but I believe every father should at least give it a shot. Fatherhood, like improv comedy, is unscripted and can be difficult but working without that net makes for the biggest laughs and memories.

– T.

If you like this, maybe you’ll like some of my other favorites? My New Morning Show,  Men Suck… , The Wonder of a Weed, and the G-Talk series


If you like what you’re reading, please SUBSCRIBE on the front page and we’ll send you an email when a new blog goes up. Plus you can LIKE us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter and Instagram too.

G-Talk: The One About Baseball

By | Daddy, Daughter, Fathers and Daughters, G-Talk, Growing Up, Memories, Personality, Relationships, Spring Time, Toddlers | One Comment

48760-1350637836Am I an optimist? Of course, I’m a Chicago Cubs fan and every year hope springs eternal.

Is my daughter an optimist? I think so… but I know she’s a Cubs fan.

She was with us at Wrigley Field handing the engagement ring to Jana when I proposed. (The Cardinals won the game but I still left the ballpark happy.) She has to wear her “baseball shoes”…also known as blue sparkly shoes…when we play pepper with the inflatable beach baseball. Her one and only ball cap is a flowery one with a big C on the front. She’s in.

So she noticed Dad’s excitement when Opening Day came around this week. She’s too young for me to explain that Theo Epstein has us on a schedule and that the true results of his farm club work won’t show up for a couple of years… so instead, I asked her what she knew about the game.

In the process, I got to explain Cracker Jacks and how long a century is…and maybe unicorns aren’t such a bad idea (but only if they can switch hit.)

Here’s the one about baseball…

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Catch previous G-Talks: The one about The Skunk,  The Bat,  and Bad Breath


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Gold Medal Dad: Substance Over Style from David Wise

By | Daddy, Daughter, Fathers and Daughters, Memories, Parenting, Relationships, Toddlers | No Comments

 

The unveiled Sochi 2014 Olympic Gold Medal is displayed during an IOC executive board meeting at the SportAccord International Convention in St. Petersburg, on May 30, 2013. The Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics organisers unveiled today the medals for the 2014 Winter Olympic Games. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV        (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)

KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images

I was watching the halfpipe freeskiing competition the other night on the Olympics and caught a Daddy/Daughter moment that touched my heart.

After one of his runs down the pipe, skier David Wise kissed his 2-year old daughter Nayeli on the cheek.

Only she wasn’t there.

Wise’s wife was at the bottom of the hill with a giant blown up picture of his daughter on a stick. He kissed the picture on the cheek. It was adorable.

Wise, a 23-year old from Reno, ended up winning the gold medal in the first halfpipe skiing contest in Olympic history.

I thought to myself ‘There’s a very marketable kid. He’s handsome, well-spoken, and humble.’ I didn’t know much about him other than the fact that he was going to be on the Today Show the next morning. I figured he’d have sponsors lined up for endorsement deals with his easy-on-the-eyes looks and demeanor.

But from what I’m reading. That isn’t the case.

Jeff Passan wrote an article for Yahoo! Sports that said…

“David Wise…does not exactly appeal to the same sort of crowd as Shaun White or Danny Davis or pretty much any snowboarder. There is something backward about this…that by all accounts a good guy who loves his wife and kid and Christianity and actually spends time in the gym and isn’t really down with late-night partying is the freak.”

“Wise’s case might be the oddest of all: he could appeal to a massive swath of people. That swath happens to be the very last group of people freeskiing wants to capture.”

READ the whole article here. It’s insightful.

It also poses a question for those Dads out there who aren’t ever going to stand on a dais with a gold medal while the National Anthem gets played…

“Who are you performing for?”

As far as I can tell, Wise accepts his God-given ability and puts his best effort forward for no other reason other than its what he feels he is supposed to do. By skier and snowboard standards, he lives an “abnormal” life. But its right for him because he is “performing” for those that matter: his family, his God.

Who are you performing for? When you spend time with your daughter, when you buy her a gift, or when you take a picture of her to share… where is your heart?

Daddy Daughter Time was created to encourage and enable fathers to spend more time with their daughters. I started it because I want other fathers to realize the importance their relationship has and will have on the lives of their girls.

But the time I spend with Grace isn’t for show. I do the things I do with her because I feel I should use my God-given ability and put my best effort forward for no other reason other than that I feel it is what I am supposed to do as a Dad.

If DDT didn’t exist, we would still be doing the exact same thing.

But I also believe that you spending time together with your daughter is one of the most important investments you can make and I hope the events, pictures, blogs, and more that I and the other DDT Dads share on this site and through social media inspire you to make that time happen. If just one Dad “gets it”, I’ll be happy. But I’m hoping for many more.

The time I put in now with her may garner rewards I’ll never see and that’s okay. Nobody needs to hang a medal on me to know if I’m doing it right. Grace’s arms around my neck as she says “I love you Daddy” in my ear is all the glory I’ll ever need.

T.


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Review: The School Zone Little Scholars Tablet

By | Activities, Daddy, Daughter, Development, education, Fathers and Daughters, Parenting, Play Time, product review, Technology, Toddlers | One Comment

little-scholarLately, I’ve been on a huge “lo-tech” kick with my daughter.

Instead of watching a movie, we make a craft together. Instead of playing Clumsy Ninja on the iPhone, we play hide-and-seek, and instead of using the iPad as a Netflix babysitter, we (gasp) play… outside! (When the weather lets us, that is).

As a guy who was often raised by episodes of Gilligan’s Island, Saturday morning cartoons and Atari, I wanted to break the cycle of small screen addiction.

Don’t get me wrong. Electronics are awesome for kids. The educational apps and toys available have me believing my gifted girl is going to be valedictorian of her Kindergarten class someday. Plus, these devices can be used as great rewards for good behavior. Giving her time on them is motivation for clean rooms, fewer tantrums, and well-behaved young lady. So it’s a bonus when the “iPad” she uses is a School Zone Little Scholars tablet.

But first I had some questions. Would she be able to adjust to the different look and feel of an Android-based piece of equipment after being an Apple kid? Would she like the content and games? Would I have to re-learn a new system to keep her from downloading other content, etc.?

Looks like I had nothing to worry about.

It’s been one month since she’s gotten it. She calls it her “school iPad” and prefers it over the Apple.

I had the thing charged and connected to my home’s Wifi in a cinch. I didn’t have to download a thing. It comes with over 150 preloaded apps, videos, ebooks, and songs that help her master math, reading, and spelling.

The games are progressive in their challenge level and are very creative. There’s nothing cuter than a three year old saying “Daddy, look! These are my metacarpals.” It looks like somebody’s been playing the Napoleon Bone Apart game again.

She likes to take pictures with the built-in cameras (front and back) and we both like to watch “Charlie and Company” videos and try to “puzzle it out” along with Miss Ellie and her golden retriever Charlie. The educational video series combines live action and animation.

EXTRA BONUS: The School Zone company is Michigan-based and features Michigan talent including local musician Brian Vander Ark from the band The Verve Pipe. Local is good.

There is no credit card or registration needed. No apps to download. No upsells within the tablet to buy more apps (that’s huge), no “lite” or School-Zone-Logopartial programs, no advertisements, and no worries about her accessing something her young eyes and ears shouldn’t be exposed to. Seriously, it rules.

But what I really, really love is the A+ report card. This is a parent’s dream with all of the stats: how long she’s used it, which category and school level she spends the most time in (Kindergarten level spelling rules in our house), how she’s performing in each category, and many more metrics. You can play the role of teacher with exact information on what she needs help with. I don’t get anything like that on the Apple iPad. It’s my new favorite thing.

The content is aimed at ages 3-7. You can get all of the hardware stats on their site for details on memory, USB drives, and more. You can purchase one for only $199 and I’d have to say they are fully DaddyDaughterTime approved!

T.


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5 Resolutions for the Single Dad

By | Daddy, Daughter, Fathers and Daughters, Memories, Toddlers | No Comments

top 5Whether you are a single Dad or not, these five are my personal reminders for the New Year. Hope they help keep you on track or nudge you back.

1. Traditions – Keep the good ones and add more. “Milkshake Mondays” needs to make a comeback (even if I’m trying to lose weight). While we have dozens of routines in place, a few big traditions are a good way to create long lasting memories.

2. Relations – Not everybody has a friendly split up. Continue to try and improve conversations and the relationship with her mother. How your daughter sees/hears you treating her mom is incredibly important. This can be tough for those going through a divorce/custody battle but setting a good example for your daughter should be motivation enough for you.

3. Action – There is so much to do within 30 miles of the house…(nature hikes, the beach, downtown ice skating, etc.) not to mention IN the house with my new subscription to Kiwi Crate. Stay active! But at the same time…

4. Moderation – Strive for a balance between fun events and simple chill time. Not every moment has to be scheduled with extravaganzas. Sometimes the best time, is when “nothing” is happening at home.

5. Contributions – College tuition isn’t going to go down and education is a big deal in our house. Time to up the game and get that fund built up. Check out programs that lock in college tuition at today’s rates with regular donations.

Most importantly, listen, love, and spend as much time with your daughter as you can. DaddyDaughterTime is the best time. Have a safe and Happy New Year!

T.

 


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The Almighty Sticker

By | Bedtime, Daddy, Daughter, Development, Fathers and Daughters, Memories, Parenting, Rewards, Tips, Toddlers, Toilet Training | No Comments


HeartStickersRepeat after me… “All hail The Sticker: Wondrous tool of motivation, calmer of sobs, and source of hours of entertainment.”

I don’t know how people were able to parent before the invention of the sticker (maybe they painted rocks?) but I’m fairly sure they would have clamored for them if available.

I was reading a great blog from Ask Your Dad called “How to Put Our Kids to Bed – Part 175”  when I came across yet another testament to the power of the adhesive ally all adults should adore.

Here’s an abbreviated excerpt:

Before we introduced the sticker, there was a point that you could tell how the exit was going to go. It was either going to smoothly transition to hugs-and-kisses, or was going to result in yelling, and crying (by all involved), and everyone is mad and sad and please for the love of God, everyone go to sleep.

Then the sticker idea came to us. One night on a whim, right before bedtime, I ran downstairs and grabbed a piece of black card stock. I drew a crude grid, stole a sheet of stickers from Duchess’s sticker box, and proceeded to present her with the best reward system she’s seen in her three years on this planet. We told her if she went to bed nice and (more importantly), didn’t wake up her brother, she got a sticker. Enough stickers and she gets a new book for bedtime. Duchess’s mind = blown.

We all became bedtime ninjas. She started crawling to her bed like a cat (and insisting we did to). 

We lost track of how many stickers she was getting. The amount of stickers that earned a prize became arbitrary. To her, it was just about the stickers. We go back in her room sometimes and find her on the floor in front of her nightlight, ear to ear grin, staring at all the stickers she’s earned. Sure, she should be in bed. But she’s not waking up her brother. And that’s fine by me. As far as John and I are concerned, we’ve won this battle, armed only with a piece of paper and a pack of heart stickers.”

You should read the full account. It’s hilarious.

If you’re looking for someone to thank, it would be R. Stanton Avery who created the first self adhesive label in 1935. Or Sir Rowland Hill in 1839 with his stamps. Or the “sticker monster who poops them out”. All of these were answers I received when researching the question of who invented the sticker.

Regardless, I’m reminded of a very similar chart above my daughter’s toilet while we were potty training that had special ‘pee’ and ‘poo’ stickers that when accumulated would result in a prize.

Stickers are everywhere – at the doctor, the dentist, the bank, her school, the grocery store… it goes on and on. One of the games on her iPad even rewards her with digital stickers.

Stickers are a reward, a fashion accessory, and an educational tool. They hold a magical power I can only begin to understand. Tip: Put a packet of stickers next to the travel Kleenex and fruit snacks that already have a permanent place in your pocket and you’ll find there’s nothing you can’t handle.

T.  

G-Talk: The One About Bad Breath

By | Activities, Daddy, Daughter, Development, Fathers and Daughters, G-Talk, Growing Up, Memories, Parenting, Relationships, Toddlers | 2 Comments

BPA-PVC-Phthalate-free-Toothbrush-GuideThey say women are emotional creatures and I say they are right.

But I really like puzzles. So having a daughter is like having a speed pass to the best ride at EmotionalPuzzlerland.

Since I only have my one child, I have no frame of reference to know whether my daughter is more or less of an emotional roller coaster than a son would be. It doesn’t really matter. I love being the constant and steady one while she goes from one mood to the next at the flip of a switch.

They also say “wait until she’s a teenager” and they are probably right about that too.

But while she’s still just 3 years old, it’s fun to watch the range of emotions. A few days ago she was playing with her doll when she immediately went into a funk without a word. I asked her what was wrong?

This is what she said.

Here’s “the one about bad breath”…I apologize in advance for the gargling.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/118915655?secret_token=s-d0cjp” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

T.

PS – Did you hear “the one about the bat?”


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